Tips To Minimize Stress

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  1. Try to think of information as a rug. It’s all rolled up and you can’t see the whole picture, but once you spread it on the floor, you know what’s what. Your mind is a rug. You can unravel it, like, any moment and see where the battered bits are. It’s important to use this metaphor while studying, as it shows not only what you learnt, but what you have to.
  2. Use large sheets of paper to outline information. If you are taking history exam, make a list of dates and names, and make a column of positive and negative outcomes. If we are talking about literature, pick your favorite character and create a list of their virtues and flaws. Write a detailed review and keep it close so you can revise it any second.
  3. When you use color in your studies, it’s called color coding. By highlighting the battles red and the times of peace blue, you make learning process a bit more fun. If you need to organize your thoughts, it’s time you rediscover colorful pencils. Scientists call it memory boosters, or mnemonics. You sort of create an association in your head that you can later remember and recreate.
  4. Make it a parent-child issue. Preparing for an exam is like putting a ‘do not disturb’ sign on the door. You can ask your parents to cook meals for you during the examination period so you won’t stress out in the kitchen and save some time. You can also revise together and create a fake stress situation in order to see how you handle it.
  5. Get help from other sources. If you’ve got a written test, try to find assignment help online. There are services specializing in custom papers that are both inexpensive and effective. Avoid scam sites and read feedback to know if the service is really worth it, and don’t forget about free revisions.
  6. Do not talk to your classmates if you don’t feel like doing it. You all know how it is. You step out of the examination room just to be surrounded by your fellow students like a group of vultures. They start asking questions and comparing results. Believe us, there is no need to worry. You can do absolutely nothing if you spent an hour and a half scribbling about Henry V when it was Henry VII. Most of us can survive through this by breathing air through our lungs, but this is the case when you need a deep breath to calm down. Imagine you are becoming smarter every time you inhale. It will allow oxygen access and better performance. You can now take your pen and proceed with the task, but we advise you to read it carefully before you start. After all, you don’t need another breathing session, do you?